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18 / 08 / 2004
Aurora Sánchez, journalist and writer: To give a hug to someone who needs it already is already a contribution to human rights

The "141 questions" of the Forum (100): "From which culture do human rights emanate? Can we generalize them?" Aurora Sánchez Nadal, journalist and Nicaraguan writer, expressed the opinion that it would be difficult to speak about human rights while children must go to work in order to survive. As a woman who suffered the murder of her 20 year-old son during the Argentine dictatorship, she demands "a greater awareness towards human rights, not just from nine to five". A committed supporter of the policies that allow a better distribution of wealth and an alternative "to the corrupt government" that flaunts its power in Nicaragua, she maintains that it is worth the trouble to fight for a better world: "We will not see it, but we should not let it go, however hard the fight may be”

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Aurora Sanchez, journalist and writer, emphasized at the Haima Stage that the children must play, study, love, but never work: "We must put pressure on governments so that they generate jobs with worthy wages and reach a situation where children do not see themselves as having to work in order to survive". She reflected that we can hardly speak too often of human rights while there are five-year-old children who say that the happiest day of their lives "was when they ate rotten chicken". After condemning the fact that tens of thousands of children die of hunger every day, she encouraged policies to be put into practice that would allow a better distribution of wealth: "How can some sportsmen and women make so much money? Why are they millionaires when the scientists who investigate and look for vaccines that benefit humanity are not?" she concluded.

Losing her son during the Argentine military dictatorship, "finally after fifteen years, three years ago they found his body in a communal grave", she understands that only those who have first-hand experience of their human rights being violated can fully take on board what this really means. In spite of everything, she still thinks it is possible to create effective awareness among those who have no experience of this, "as long as it's not just from 9 to 5 and, from then on, giving in to the conditioning factors of the bourgeois way of life".

The journalist and writer from Nicaragua commented that "giving a hug to somebody that needs to be hugged, is a way of contributing towards human rights", and she expressed her perplexity at those who think they can help out the needy without taking into account their most pressing needs: "In the aftermath of a hurricane, you can't offer psychological help to somebody who no longer has a house to live in, and who has nothing to eat. First you've got to cover their basic needs and then take care to tend to their psychological needs". In a similar context, and to illustrate the differences that separate wealthy and impoverished societies, she related her experience in a congress held in 1987 in Germany, when "people were discussing bras", while in Nicaragua we were trying to avoid more young peopld getting killed in the war, to get basic food supplies for people to eat, to get medicines into the country.

In terms of the reality in her country, Aurora Sánchez expressed her regret at the fact that "we have gone from being the center of attention of the American continent, to being it's backyard". She went on to condemn "corrupt governments" that wield power in Nicaragua and raised the question "how is it possible that the mayor of Managua earns more money than the mayor of Miami?" Still in terms of criticism, she reminded the audience that her country "after shaking off the yoke of illiteracy and dictatorship now the country is more illiterate than ever”.

In spite of everything, she maintains it is worth the trouble of fighting for a better world: “We will not see it but we should not let it go, however hard the fight may be”.