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02 / 06 / 2004
For Enrique Ocharán “Energy reserves are not the main problem, the emissions of carbon dioxide are”

The deputy director general of energy planning of the Ministry of Industry and Energy of Spain proposes to replace fossil fuels for natural gas I energy production

The deputy director general of energy planning of the Ministry of Industry and Energy of Spain, Enrique Ocharán, the main problems is not the search for new reserves of energy but the control and cut down on the emissions of carbon dioxide that affect the environment. Ocharán gave his insights during the panel the panel “Energy Scenarios: Are Developed Societies Energy Hungry?” which took place as part of the Dialogue “Energy and Sustainable Development: Where are we going?” to finish on 3 June at the Forum Site.

Ocharán pointed out that the technology with the potential to reduce the emissions of carbon dioxide exists and that it must be taken advantage of, although he emphasized that no technology can solve on its own the problem of polluting emissions. With regard to policies, he said that each region and country must create their own “energy mix” according to their geographical particulars.

He also proposed to replace the poor carbons containing and emitting dioxides for natural gas, while he called on multidisciplinary international cooperation in order to find solutions to the energy challenges of today.

For his part, Wade Malcolm, president and executive director of EPRI Worldwide, stressed the need for a stable market which should be structured in a way that it allows the saving of energy and leads to optimization for its use in public services.

The participants in the panel have agreed that the present energy situation is unsustainable as it permanently encourages an increase in consumption, is harmful for the environment, and contributes to deplete energy sources at a fast pace without investing on research that will help find alternative sources.